Grace Lee Boggs, Social Change Evolutionary

 

by Ryan Garza, Feb. 2014

Grace Lee Boggs, photo by Ryan Garza  (Feb. 2014)

Social change activist, philosopher and visionary Grace Lee Boggs died on Oct. 5, 2015 at age 100. Such a life of meaning she lived! If you didn’t know of Grace, I would like to introduce you to her.

Grace endeavored to better the world in every possible way, right up to her last days. Working for social change wasn’t something that she could ever retire from. It’s who she was, for over 70 years.

Browse the quotes and links below to learn more about Grace’s fascinating life and her unique vantage point on the human condition. For lots more, visit the Boggs Center website.


“The world is waiting for a new dream… We are shaking the world with a new dream. Feel it! Guard it! Treasure it! These opportunities do not come often.”

“These are the times to grow our souls. Each of us is called upon to embrace the conviction that despite the powers and principalities bent on commodifying all our human relationships, we have the power within us to create the world anew.”

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Glimpses of a Possible World with Charles Eisenstein

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Charles Eisenstein in Oakland, June 2015

Last weekend’s Whole Person Economy Satsang at Oakland’s Impact Hub featured speaker-author-philosopher Charles Eisenstein, who is conceptualizing new ways of living on the earth.

Eisenstein’s grounded hope, great mind, big heart, and gritty vision all conspire to inspire.

Below are 20 ideas I was particularly struck by from his Oakland remarks. If these quotes speak to you, follow the links in the endnotes for abundant ideas and inspiration.


1.   We are witnessing the death process of the story that has been part of humanity for thousands of years… the story of separation.

2.   Racism, sexism, ecocide are all the fruits of a world view rooted in domination. The ideological core of our society is hollowing out. We don’t believe the old story any more.

3.   In the space between stories, our own understanding of causality has become suspect. How do we navigate in such a moment?

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